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CHILD

CHILD SAFETY


Here in the TBW community, keeping children safe is our #1 priority. In addition to the tips you see on this page, if you have any tips, links, safety products, or other ideas on how we can keep the children in our community safe, please let us know!

During Outside Play

So, seriously? We're not going to wrap our children in bubble wrap (even though we would like to), are we?

But, how do we keep our kids safe while they are outside playing?

  1. Watch them!
  2. Make sure they are playing with age appropriate toys.
  3. Have them wear a helmet and elbow & knee pads while riding bicycles, scooters and using roller blades/skates.
  4. Don't let young children play in the street.

Check out the National Program for Playground Safety for additional playground safety tips and products.

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Every Day Precautions

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School Safety

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Toy Safety

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Car Seat & Vehicle Travel

-CDC Child Passenger Safety

-Seat Belt safety

-4511.81 Child restraint system - child highway safety fund

-A Child Passenger Safety Technician is a trained individuals who can show you how to property install your child's car seat. Click to Find a CPS Technician near you!

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                Going On Vacation...

or Just Around Town...               

              Going On Vacation...

or Just Around Town...             

Please keep in mind that when you go on vacation, it's extremely easy for children to wander off and get lost! Both you and your children are out of your own element so keep a good eye on your children and NEVER assume that they are with someone else...

Tot Survives 8-Mile River Ride on Toy


Don't leave children in a car unattended!

Child Vehicular Heat Stroke Fact Sheet

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Columbus Public Health: Need a Car Seat or Car Seat Safety Check?

Safety Around Water

Pools, lakes, ponds, beaches, and bathtubs can be a lot of fun for kids but can also be dangerous if parents don't take the proper precautions to keep their children safe.  Young children are especially at risk as they can drown in less than 2 inches of water and need supervision even around bird baths and ornamental ponds.  Nearly 1,000 kids die each year by drowning and most drownings happen in home swimming pools.  It is the second leading cause of accidental death for people between the ages of 5 and 24.  Here are some general safety tips to prepare your children for any body of water:

  • It is a good idea that everyone, no matter their age, learn how to swim.  Local recreation centers such as the Jerry L. Garver YMCA on Refugee Rd, have qualified instructors and offer swimming lessons for members and non-members of all ages.
  • Don't assume that a child who knows how to swim isn't at risk for drowning though.  All kids need to be supervised in the water, no matter what their swimming skills.  Infants, toddlers, and weak swimmers should have an adult swimmer within arm's reach at all times, to provide "touch supervision."
  • Invest in proper-fitting, Coast Guard-approved flotation devices (life vests) and have kids wear them whenever near water. Check the weight and size recommendations on the label, then have your child try it on to make sure it fits snugly. For kids younger than 5 years old, choose a vest with a strap between the legs and head support — the collar will keep the child's head up and face out of the water. Inflatable vests and arm devices such as water wings are not effective protection against drowning
  • A temperature below 70°F (20°C) is cold to most swimmers.  Recommended water temperatures vary depending on the activity and a swimmer's age, as well as for pregnant women.  But in general, 82°-86°F (28°-30°C) is comfortable for recreational swimming for children.  Body temperature drops more quickly in water than on land, and it doesn't take long for hypothermia (when the body loses heat faster than it can produce it) to set in.  If a child is shivering or has muscle cramps, get him or her out of the water immediately.
  • Find out where the water hazards in your neighborhood are. Who has a pool or hot tub?  Where are the retaining ponds or creeks that may attract kids?  Tell neighbors who have pools that you have a young child and ask them to keep their gates locked.
  • Never swim in bad weather, especially if there is lightning as water is a conductor of electricity.

Around the Pool

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), fences around pools should meet these standards:

  • Fences should stand at least 4 feet (130 centimeters) high with no foot or handrails for kids to climb on.
  • The slats should be less than 4 inches (110 millimeters) apart so a child can't get through, or if chain link, should have no opening larger than 1¾ inches (50 millimeters).
  • Gates should be self-closing and self-latching, and the latch should be out of kids' reach.

You can buy other devices, such as pool covers and alarms, but these haven't been proved effective against drowning for very young children, so fencing remains your best measure of protection.

Lakes, Ponds & Rivers

  • Don't let kids swim without adult supervision — lakes or ponds might be shallow near the bank, but increase in depth sharply farther out from shore.
  • Watch out for weeds and grass that could entangle a leg or arm. 
  • NEVER walk on a lake, pond, or river that appears to be iced over. While it may appear frozen enough to walk on, this is rarely the case. Ice only begins to be "safe" at around 4 - 6 inches thickness, but even at a 9" - 10" of thickness, there can be unforeseen hazards that weaken the underside of the ice. There is no way to determine the thickness of the ice, or determine these unforeseen hazards, with just your eyes.

At the Beach

  • Never swim close to piers or large rocks because sudden water movements may cause swimmers to collide with them.
  • The beach has special dangers like currents and tides so pay close attention to the Beach Warning Flags, as they will give you an idea as to the current water conditions. 
  • Don't allow kids to swim in large waves or undertows, and tell them never to stand with their back to the water because a sudden wave can easily knock them over.
  • Teach kids that if they're caught in a rip current or undertow, they should swim parallel to the shore or should tread water and call for a lifeguard's help.
  • Be mindful of jellyfish and other wildlife that may result in a painful encounter. 

In the Home

  • Never leave a young child unattended in the bathroom, especially while bathing, even if the child appears to be well propped in a safety tub or bath ring.  Put away hair dryers and all other electrical appliances to avoid the risk of electrocution.
  • Hot water also can be dangerous, particularly for kids younger than 5, who have thinner skin than older kids and adults, so can burn more easily. Just 3 seconds of exposure to hot tap water that's 140°F (60°C) can give a child a third-degree burn.
  • You can reduce the risk of scalding by turning the water heater thermostat in your home down to 120°F (49°C) and by always testing the water with your wrist or elbow before placing your child in the bath.


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In A Water Emergency

Whenever a child is missing, always check the water first. Survival depends on a quick rescue and restarting breathing as soon as possible:

  • If you find a child in the water, immediately get the child out while calling loudly for help. If someone else is available, have them call 911. Check to make sure the child's air passages are clear. If the child is not breathing, start CPR if you are trained to do so. When the emergency number is called, follow the instructions the emergency operators provide.
  • If you think the child may have suffered a neck injury, such as from diving, keep the child on his or her back and brace the neck and shoulders with your hands and forearms to help keep the neck from moving until emergency help arrives. This type of immobilization minimizes further injury to the spine and is best done by someone who is trained in the technique. Keep the child still and speak in calm tones to keep the child comforted. Continue to watch for adequate breathing.

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Cyber Safety

Federal Law 18 U.S.C. § 1470 (2008)

Under Federal Law, 18 U.S.C. § 1470 (2008), it is a federal crime to send obscene material to a child under the age of 16 if the sender knows that the recipient is under the age of 16.

§ 1470. TRANSFER OF OBSCENE MATERIAL TO MINORS

Whoever, using the mail or any facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce, knowingly transfers obscene matter to another individual who has not attained the age of 16 years, knowing that such other individual has not attained the age of 16 years, or attempts to do so, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.

Online Safety Quick Tips

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Preventing

Knowing what your children are doing online is the most crucial step to protecting them from unsolicited sexual content, contact and bullying.  If you are looking for additional protection, the following internet filtering programs offer that added internet security.

Total Net Guard

Content Watch

Hedge Builders

Integrity Online

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Reporting Inappropriate Material

Report any inappropriate sexual material that your child may receive, immediately to the law enforcement agency that covers the address you are at, at the time the content is received.  Make sure that a police report is filed, and get a report/incident number from the responding officer.  Most counties have a victim advocacy program that can help you and your family following such incidents.

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Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media helps families make smart media choices.  They offer the largest, most trusted library of independent age-based and educational ratings and reviews for movies, games, apps, TV shows, websites, books, and music. Their Parent Concerns and Parent Blog help families understand and navigate the problems and possibilities of raising children in the digital age.

Visit Common Sense Media

More than 85% of the perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in America were the parents or relatives of the victims.






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All persons (including doctors, mental health professionals, child care providers, dentists, family members and friends) must report suspected cases of child abuse. Failure to report child abuse is a violation of the law. If you believe a child has been abused by a parent, relative, friend or stranger, call the State DCS office (Directory of Numbers), the Juvenile Court or the chief law enforcement officer in your area.


-Information for this page was taken from the National Foundation for Abused and Neglected Children.

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Common indicators that abuse and/or neglect may be taking place:

  • They have repeated injuries that are not properly treated or adequately explained.
  • They begin acting in unusual ways ranging from disruptive and aggressive to passive and withdrawn.
  • They act in the role of the parent toward their brothers and sisters or even toward their own parents.
  • Their sleep is disturbed (nightmares, bedwetting, fear of sleeping alone, need a nightlight).
  • They lose their appetite or overeat.
  • There is a sudden drop in school grades or participating in activities.
  • They may act in stylized ways, such as sexual behavior that is not normal for their age group.

The following signs may indicate that something is wrong but do not necessarily point to abuse.

  • Parents who abuse and/or neglect their children may show some common characteristics.
  • They seem to be isolated from the community and have no close friends.
  • When asked about a child's injury, they offer conflicting reasons or no explanation at all.
  • They seem unwilling or unable to provide for a child's basic needs.
  • They expect too much of their children.
  • They don't supervise or discipline their children in ways that teach them to correct their behavior.

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