Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Click Here to Add a Title

EARTHQUAKES

Click Here to Add a Title

Click this text to start editing. This block is a basic combination of a title and a paragraph. Use it to welcome visitors to your website, or explain a product or service without using an image. Try keeping the paragraph short and breaking off the text-only areas of your page to keep your website interesting to visitors.

Click Here to Add a Title

Facts About Ohio Earthquakes

So you ask... Really, do we really need to worry about earthquakes in Ohio?!!!  Well, yes we do.

History

The biggest earthquake recorded in Ohio was on March 9, 1937 in Anna, Ohio (Shelby County). The U.S. Geological Survey assigned a magnitude of 5.4 to this earthquake.

ยท Generally earthquakes of a 2.0 magnitude and higher can be felt by most. However, those who are closest to the epicenter of the earthquake have reported feeling earthquakes in the high 1.0 magnitude range. At such a low range though, many people don't recognize the vibrations as an earthquake.

Learn More

How do I know when there is an earthquake?

Many people describe a booming sound, that decreases to a low rumble as it quickly passes into the distance, followed by a sharp jolt and a few seconds of shaking. The booming sound many people report is thought to be from P waves (the fastest moving seismic waves) exiting the ground and in audible frequencies. Some noise though is probably related to the shaking of the building and to the brittle bedrock as the seismic wave pass through.

Learn More

What is the largest threat of an earthquake, in Ohio?

The largest threat of an earthquake in Ohio comes from the New Madrid, Missouri region where from December, 1811 through February, 1812 earthquakes in this region were reported in the 7-8 magnitude range.

Learn More

Has anyone died from an Ohio earthquake?

According to reports, no one has died from earthquakes in Ohio, however injuries such as minor cuts and scrapes were reported as a result of the 1986 earthquake that hit Chardon, Ohio.

Learn More

How Big of An Earthquake Can We Have In Ohio?

The magnitude of an earthquake depends on the length of rupture of a fault. Big faults will generate big earthquakes and small faults will generate small earthquakes.  Most faults in Ohio are poorly known and are not visible at the surface.  Seismologists have conservatively speculated that the western Ohio seismic zone could generate an earthquake with a magnitude of between 6.5 and 7.0 and the northeastern seismic zone could generate an earthquake with a magnitude of between 6.0 and 6.5.  If Ohio has the potential for an earthquake above 6.0 magnitude, it could occur tomorrow or even thousands of years from now.

Is There A Warning System?

No.  The fastest-moving seismic waves, P waves, travel at about 6 kilometers per second. The Cincinnati area is about 500 kilometers from the New Madrid zone; therefore, P waves from a large New Madrid event would reach southwestern Ohio in a little less than a minute and a half and the more damaging S waves would arrive about a minute later. This would not be enough time to warn people to take cover, but automatic electronic warning systems could be triggered to shut down some critical facilities.

In The Event Of

- Drop to your hands and knees. Cover your head and neck with your arms. Hold on to any sturdy furniture until the shaking stops. Crawl only if you can reach better cover without going through an area with more debris.

- If in bed, stay there and cover your head and neck with a pillow.

- If inside, stay there until the shaking stops. DO NOT run outside.

- If in a vehicle, stop in a clear area that is away from buildings, trees, overpasses, underpasses, or utility wires.

- If you are in a high-rise building, expect fire alarms and sprinklers to go off. Do not use elevators.

- If near slopes, cliffs, or mountains, be alert for falling rocks and landslides.


Did you feel an earthquake?  You can report it here.

Want to Know More?

Click Here to Add a Title

Click this text to start editing. This block is a basic combination of a title and a paragraph. Use it to welcome visitors to your website, or explain a product or service without using an image. Try keeping the paragraph short and breaking off the text-only areas of your page to keep your website interesting to visitors.

0